©istockphoto/ynoclub

Match Your Personality Type to the Dog You Should Adopt

Much like trying to find your future husband or wife, finding a good-fit for your K-9 companion is imperative. Think about it, you’re going to be with this furry creature for 10-15 years, so it stands to reason that choosing a dog whose temperament, energy level, and personality mesh well with your own is a smart move. That being said, read on to discover the type of dog that might make the best companion for you.

The Quirky, Fun-Loving, and Lightly-Active Apartment Dweller
Not looking for a dog to hike up mountains or train for a marathon with, but still want one that’s energetic and loving? Consider a pug. This happy breed will happily go on walks and to the dog park with you, typically socializes well with other dogs, and are the best little snugglers in the world. Because they are so social, you may want to consider getting them in pairs so they will have a friend to play with when you’re away.

©istockphoto/olenalyzun
©istockphoto/olenalyzun

The Ridiculously Athletic, On-the-Go, Home Owner
Are you a runner? Avid hiker? Mountain bike enthusiast? If so, you may consider adopting or rescuing a Rhodesian Ridgeback. These animals are work-out machines and will help you to up your game by desiring as much physical activity as you’re willing to give them. Be sure that, at the very least, you have a backyard for them to play fetch and sniff in, since these dogs need to move their bodies and have their minds stimulated regularly.

©istockphoto/Massonstock
©istockphoto/Massonstock

The Outdoorsy, Hard-Worker, with Large Tracks of Land
If you have several acres, a farm, or ranch, Catahoula Curs are amazingly intelligent and are fiercely hard workers. Whether you want them for herding, hunting, or simply as a companion to walk your property, these dogs are very people-oriented and train-up well with a firm hand. That being said, because they love to work, a Catahoula will be most happy and well-behaved when he or she has a purpose.

©istockphoto/madcorona
©istockphoto/madcorona

The Chill Renter Who Just Wants to Be Loved
You may have heard that Great Danes make excellent apartment dogs. This is actually true due to their calm nature and low need for exercise. When they’re puppies, they will definitely have energy and need socialization but, as they mature, they are generally very calm and cuddly.

Some owners who live in tight quarters opt to crop their tails because they will often knock over drinks, plants, and other low-sitting items while walking around the house. This is, of course, a personal choice but be sure to consult your vet before doing so.

©istockphoto/ChristopherBernard
©istockphoto/ChristopherBernard

The Authoritative and Loving Owner Who is Active and Up for a Challenge
Pit Bulls get a bad rap but, with the right guidance and outlets for their energetic personalities, they are calm, non-aggressive, and devoted companions. The Pit Bull is for someone with previous dog experience who is willing to train (and re-train) consistently, be active with their animal, devote the necessary time to socialize their dog, not to mention spend lots of money on chew toys. If given the opportunity to run and play at a nearby dog park, go on hikes, or fetch regularly, Pit Bulls will do well in an apartment or house with a medium sized yard. Just make sure to get them out of the house and often.

Worth mentioning, there are cities and counties that have Breed Specific Legislation in place and many of these will restrict Pit Bull ownership. This sad and discriminatory reality means that you should be sure to check your local laws before adopting a Pitty. Also, renters should be aware that many apartments do not allow bully breeds so, if you’re a renter, this might be a tricky breed for your lifestyle.

©istockphoto/kttakespix
©istockphoto/kttakespix

All said, don’t let prejudicial regulations scare you off of adopting one of these sweet and lovable dogs, just do your homework beforehand, obey the laws no matter how unreasonable, and understand that, if you do adopt a Pit Bull, it’s your responsibility to train them well so they can smash the stereotype.